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[personal profile] rackmount
I haven't done this in a long time. THese are in no particular order.

10. Siouxsie & the Banshees, Peepshow: I remember listening to Scary Mary on the BGSU radio station playing this album in its entirety, which I taped and listened to over and over. I was hooked, and it sent me in my brief goth phase. Ever since, I have always loved pop that incorporated unusual rhythms, sounds and chord changes. I had listened to some "alternative" music before this, but this is what convinced me that it was something really different than radio pop.

9: Monk, Himself: My parents had this album, and I listened to it a lot. I'm not much for jazz in general (which surprises most people), but I love how Monk turns barrel house blues and stride on their ear. His sense of rhythm and fun are fantastical to me. It's by far the album that reminds me of the best of childhood.

8: Peter Gabriel/Last Temptation of Christ and Philip Glass/the Screens: college make-out music. Carried around in my backpack "just in case." Passed around to my virginal BFFs, to their immense chagrin or delight, I'm not sure which.

7: Bach, Musical Offering: the record that started it all. I spent a lot of time in my grandpa's study when I was young because he had the only room in my grandparents' house not ruled by chaos. It smelled like old musty books, had a great vintage (or just old) black globe and a million YA-type history books, and an old record player with a million 60's and 70's recordings of romantic classics: lots of Brahms and Beethoven and the lesser-knowns like Fritz Kreisler usw. I listened to these with him, until one day, he pulled out the Musical Offering when I was 8 or so. I listened to it all the way through without saying anything, and afterward, I literally said: "You've been holding out on me." It was not long after that that he became my violin teacher.

6: Sugar Cubes, Here Today Tomorrow Next Week: Bjork is my pop music soul mate and I fell in love with her listening to this album. The first album is better, but I didn't hear it until after I'd heard this one. What Siouxsie hinted at, the Sugar Cubes fulfilled. This bounced me out of my goth phase, because it was the playfulness of sound that appealed to me, not the darkness.

5: Bartok string quartets: When you listen to these, you hear how an artist transforms and changes over the course of life. Ever since, I've kept seeing this manner of transformation in all sorts of artists. It's almost like a study of what it is to be an artist, but done in music.

4: Skip James, the 30s sessions: You saw Ghost World, right? You know that scene where the protagonist buys the record, takes it home and then listens to one track on it over and over and it completely dumbfounds her? The song in the movie was "Devil Got My Woman" by Skip James. That happened to me, a few years before the movie came out, with that very song. I'm not kidding. I never "got" blues until then, and it completely changed the way I hear blues. It's stunning.

3: Artful Dodger, Rewind: After five years of listening to electronic music, this is the album that made me want to produce it. So crunchy and delightful. Though I had done the club scene before this, it was what was playing for me during the heaviest of my club years, and really during the best few years of my life, when I was without a boyfriend, doing fine with my career and really living among the people who ended up becoming the best friends I had ever made since high school. This is the period I think about when I am wistful for the past.

2: Cordelia's Dad, How Can I Sleep: The sound of college for me. Yeah, there was some Ani Difranco too, and I definitely listened to her as well, but this seemed a lot more personal to me.

1: Bach cello suites: It's what I have always listened to when the world gets to be too much.

Date: 2010-11-27 11:35 am (UTC)
From: (Anonymous)
There were a couple of Glenn Gould albums that I thought might make your cut; I scanned ahead looking for either the Goldbergs or Well Tempered Clavier. Maybe you were just in love with him and not the albums.

Date: 2010-11-28 03:09 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] rackmount.livejournal.com
I went back and forth a couple of times about this. Musical Offering made the cut because it was the first, and the cello suites edged out goldbergs the day I wrote this, but I go back and forth. Maybe it's because I'm in a particularly introverted and depressive state right now, but the suites are getting a lot more play than the goldbergs. i think when i'm feeling more confident and happy, it's the other way round.

also, these aren't necessarily all of my _favorite_ albums. that would be a different list. a lot of these wouldn't necessarily make the favorite album cut. they were just albums that featured really prominently during certain parts of my life, or bits that influenced me a lot.

Oh You Kid

Date: 2010-11-28 11:52 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] rpkrajewski.livejournal.com
Peter Gabriel/Last Temptation of Christ and Philip Glass/the Screens: college make-out music.

Waka-waka-wow!

Re: Oh You Kid

Date: 2010-11-29 04:51 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] rackmount.livejournal.com
I'd love to know what your college make-out music was. :)

Re: Oh You Kid

Date: 2010-11-29 04:52 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] rackmount.livejournal.com
Also, I found these albums HIGHLY effective, although I cannot say I had a control for this study. :)

Re: Oh You Kid

Date: 2010-11-29 07:13 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] rpkrajewski.livejournal.com
Ah, now, there's the rub – I just didn't have opportunity to run experiments of this type very much. (Darn!) Probably I would have gone for David Sylvian back then…

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